Valentine’s Ashes

Thank you Patti Brown for this amazing photo. 2008.

Thank you Patti Brown for this amazing photo. 2008.

I suppose this time of year is unbearably hard for those who don’t have a Valentine. I have never been a big fan of the holiday, even when I did have a Valentine. Now it seems every commercial, every restaurant, grocery store and online pop up ad flashed a “YOU DONT HAVE A VALENTINE” in my face. Yes, I do have a Valentine. A man who has loved me when I am not worthy and who has forgiven my faults and shortcomings for many years. A man I admired and respected enough to marry and have a family with. So, I know I have a Valentine, but according to the ad executives, I don’t. Because he can’t buy me jewelry or chocolates or the perfect Hallmark card. He didn’t even remember or seemed concerned once he was given his chocolates and told “Happy Valentine’s Day”. That is the part that stings now. He was at the point where he couldn’t think far enough ahead to plan for a holiday. Now, when the holiday is here, he is oblivious to what his role would have been. Each year that passes and each holiday that has expectations attached reveal the layers that have peeled away in Jim’s mindset.

I spent Valentine’s evening dropping Frances off with a friend so she could spend the night and then go skiing the next day. I am so grateful to that family because she loves skiing and I am not going to be able to take her this year. When I dropped her off, the family invited me to join them for dinner. As I sat in their beautiful kitchen, watching them work together to fix a lovely meal, listening to the girls play ukuleles and joining in as everyone sang along…..my heart hurt. This was an evening that I would want to host in our own home, with Jim helping and our family being the warm and inviting refuge others want to visit. It wasn’t that I was jealous, amazingly, I wasn’t. It was just a bittersweetness and yet I was happy and having a great time. I love sharing time with them and love the fact Frances is able to visit and to be part of a family who can sing and cook together and go skiing. I love the kids being with other families and seeing what other relationships are like when one of them isn’t sick.

The next night, Jim, Brad and I went to visit different friends and it was the same.  Others working together to host us, fix a nice meal with lots of laughter and fun. Again, I was both happy and sad. I loved the fact we had friends to hang out with. I loved the fact that Brad was able to see the communication between other adult couples and play games with us and to witness a different side of marriage. Yet, I recognize that it is becoming more and more difficult to remember us as that type of couple: full of chit chat and hugs and laughter.

It must shine a magnifying glass on certain things in our home when the kids visit with their friends. I wonder if they notice the difference in marital relationships….. I am sure they do. They are observant kids. I wonder how all of this will eventually affect their own marriages and relationships…..I wonder so many things; all the time. My mind constantly seems to be going full throttle, but there are times it seems to be puttering out on me. I am forgetting words and at moments having a hard time saying exactly what I am trying to convey. It is so frustrating. I know it is the stress, but it also helps me understand how frustrating it can be for Jim to not be able to find the right words. And lately, he is having a harder and harder time.

I know I will get through this most romantic time of the year without a romantic partner. Yet, I can’t help but wonder how I will ever be happy again? I don’t mean with another man. I mean, AT ALL? By myself, with someone, with the kids….AT ALL? I know what it feels like to be loved, cared for and to have a partner; in the kitchen, on the slopes, with the kids, playing games, lying on the couch reading or watching a movie or just communicating without words…. in life….and I don’t have one anymore. I have always known I am an independent person and surely this must be coming in handy, but I don’t know that being a strong willed, independent person helps take the sting out of lonely nights and thoughts that can no longer be shared and dreams kept quiet and shows watched alone.   I am acutely aware of the singleness that is overcoming my life. Jim is fighting hard to stay with us, which makes my recognition of these feelings of aloneness and solitude more inappropriate. I am not going through a divorce. I am not part of a relationship where the husband is out all night and I am sitting home alone. I am not supporting a man who won’t go find a job. I am thankfully not caring for someone violent, angry or ungrateful. I have many things for which I am appreciative,  yet I am longing for a life I no longer have. I can witness it and taste a sampling, but I cannot have that happy home with an equal partner. The worst part is I had it. I had all of what I long for, and it is slipping away one plaque and tangle at a time.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (13)

Doctor Day Sucks!

Jim and I. Dec 2014.

Jim and I. Dec 2014.

Today was DOCTOR DAY. I think in general we usually look forward to going to the doctor, even subconsciously, to get healed. Healed from whatever is ailing us. Healed from something we may not even know is wrong. Healed from things that hurt a little and things that hurt a lot. Eventually, with the help of the almighty physician, we are healed. Unless we have something that they just can’t heal. ALS. Huntington’s Disease. Lots of types of cancers. Alzheimer’s Disease.

Today, I saw the pain of not being able to help us on Jim’s doctors’ face. And in his words.

To start with, they called Jim back without me to do the mental exam. I knew it would be lower than the last visit nine months ago, but I didn’t realize quite how low. When they called me back, I could tell the nurse, who we always see, was a tad “different”. I knew that she had seen the difference in Jim. I knew it was bothering her.

When the doctor came in, he was his usual pleasant self, but when we got down to business, he fumbled over his words. He was struggling, because as a physician you are trained to heal. You are trained to find out what is wrong and to fix it. He can’t fix what is wrong with Jim. Jim went down 6 points on the memory exam. I looked at the drawing of the clock which is always part of the exam and I saw there were no hands and the numbers were wrong. My heart sank. Even though I know he is declining, seeing it in black and white is hard. Hard. For ALL of us.

When I entered the room and it was just Jim and I, he started to cry. He knew. He knew he hadn’t done well on the test. He isn’t far enough gone to be completely oblivious. This is so painful to watch. This wonderful man, crying and realizing what is happening to him and not being able to do one single thing to make it better. He told me he wanted to move away. I asked him why. “So the kids don’t have to see me like this. I don’t want them to see me the way I am going to be.” It took every ounce of self control not to burst into tears with him. I saved that for later.

I recently went for a walk with a friend. During our hike, we discussed Jim and lots of different sides of being his caregiver. Part of the conversation went like this:

Me: I don’t really feel sorry for myself. I think sometimes I come pretty close, but for the most part, I don’t think I am.

My friend: Really? I thought from reading your blog that you were pretty sad most of the time.

(At this point I was a little surprised since I didn’t know she was keeping up with this blog)

Me: Not really. Yeah, I get sad, but I can’t stay that way all the time. It would be awful for Jim and for the kids.

My friend: You don’t feel like you feel sorry for yourself?

Me: No. I feel sorry for Jim. I look at him and I just really feel sorry for him. And I think about the kids not having him for a dad. He was such a great dad and they won’t remember all the awesome things he did with them and for them. I am a much worse parent and it’s actually sorta sad that he is the one leaving them and not me. He would be more patient and teach them so much more. I get really sad thinking that they won’t have him around and they will watch him decline more and more and it is taking over their whole childhood.

My friend: You are a great parent. You shouldn’t say that.

And then we walked. Because, what else was there to say?

Back to the doctor visit…. The doctor recommended we try Namenda and the Exelon patch again. As I have written in past blog posts, we have tried EVERYTHING and I am not going to rehash why Jim is off all meds at this time. But, I believe we are going to give them another try. He told us that sometimes when a patient is further along and showing increased symptoms the medications can show help in lessoning some of the symptoms. But of course, they aren’t a cure. As the doctor spoke and Jim listened, he started to cry again. He understood he was hearing that he is declining. The doctor told us we wouldn’t do the memory tests anymore because there wasn’t a purpose any longer and it was causing stress. He also told us we didn’t need to schedule an appointment for a set amount of time. We would start the medications and call in as needed. There is no point in seeing him as Jim declines because there is nothing else he can do. This is not to say we can’t come see him and won’t, but there is no set six month or nine month time frame anymore. Just whenever we feel we need to see him.

Whew. I am crying as I write these words. My heart aches for not only Jim, but all of us who travel this journey with no help. No way to fight. No hope.

I am not a scientific person, but many times I wish for a scientific answer. How long does Jim have? What trajectory is he on with the decline he has shown? It may seem a little morbid to some, yet others will completely understand. I think it is human nature to want to know how long you will have to endure a form of torture and pain. When will this be over? When will Jim not be in pain? Actually, that is more of a clichéd expression. Jim isn’t in pain. Only when he realizes he is leaving his children. Most of the time, he is happy go lucky and in great spirits. He has a great attitude and is very pleasant to be around. He isn’t angry or sad or even moping around. He has the best attitude he could have and I am so proud of him. So when I say something about wanting a time frame, it isn’t because I want him to be gone, it is because I am trying to plan, trying to figure things out, trying to adjust and have a concept of what lies ahead. I believe people do this in all aspects of life; whether it is planning for high school, college, their first job, marriage, having a child, moving to another country, moving out of their parents home, changing jobs, etc. We are always looking ahead and asking for time lines.

It was mentioned that Jim was declining faster than some, but not as fast as others. I guess you would say he is somewhere in the middle. Not a fast decline but not a slow one either. I didn’t ask the doctor about a time frame. He wouldn’t be able to tell me. Alzheimer’s Disease works so differently for each patient. And Jim is very healthy otherwise. I know this is a long haul. I can handle it. We all can handle it. But I hate that he is having to and I hate that the kids are having to. I hate that my friends have to take care of us and I hate that my parents must use up so much of their retirement years rushing to help us. I despise being the damsel in distress. I know Jim despises it too. He was our knight in shining armor and unfortunately, he knows he isn’t any more.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (22)

I appreciate what I have…but Miss what I don’t!

i-am-thankful-for-my-struggleThere is a little boy who is dying tonight. He is two years old and he has cancer. I don’t know his family, but I still hate what their family has endured and what they will continue to endure long after their precious son has left them. I see updates on Facebook from the family. We have mutual friends and as I have watched their fight and witnessed from afar their heartache, I have pondered life and the unfairness that happens in our universe. I see Jim, struggling to keep his dignity and to stay a dad as long as he can. And I read stories about parents losing their children. If I could somehow make it so that I had to endure the frustrations and constant sorrow I am faced with each day to save a child, I would. But as much as I wish my suffering and Jim’s suffering could abate the pain felt in another home, I know it won’t. I know I will continue to watch as Jim fights his own battle the best he can. I am only a witness to the things I recognize as more heinous than watching Jim succumb to the plaques and tangles multiplying in his brain in another family…. Losing a child would be one of them. I am so, so grateful for Frances and Brad and somehow, dealing with the pending death (albeit not tonight or tomorrow) of my spouse, I cannot help but be so grateful for having them with us and in seemingly good health. It isn’t lost on me that I may be suffering a loss, but it could be worse. To the parents who are losing a child or who have lost a child, I am so sorry. I wish I could somehow take the suffering our family must endure and replace yours. I suppose it would make all that our family is going through worth it….if we could find some good in our pain by easing the burdens others face. I sometimes wish Jim would just die. Now. I don’t really want him to die, but as I have mentioned several times, I don’t want to be part of what is coming. It is this unbelievable awful thought process: I don’t want Jim to die, but I don’t want him to continue to decline in cognitive abilities and don’t want his children to watch him suffer in a way that they can’t possibly change or help in any way. I know that Jim doesn’t want to become the person he is becoming. It can cause so much internal stress thinking about it all, the best way to handle it can be to shut down. But dementia patients need you there for them for years, so you are not allowed to shut down for long. You must stay in the present, to help them and in my case, help our children. The irony cannot be missed: my partner, my go-to person is the patient. The stress and the heartache and the gut wrenching thoughts would be eased under normal circumstances because Jim and I would discuss them and he would be my sounding board and my help. I have come to realize with much clarity that even marriages in troubled times have two partners. Partners that can communicate. Partners who can help with whatever needs helping; dishes, yardwork, decisions on finances, disciplining the kids, vacation ideas, what to do with free time, what to watch on TV, what to do about life situations that happen with friends and family, co-workers, cable companies, etc. I have opportunity to sit back and watch relationships now with a different thought process and a much different appreciation. Even my friends who complain about their spouses (and as they do they usually apologize to me and tell me they shouldn’t be complaining to me of all people) have to recognize the simple pleasure of having a partner who is there, in the moment and who can carry on a REAL conversation and even if they are driving you crazy with the point of view they have, at least they have a point of view. At least they can listen and comprehend you are upset or need to vent or have ideas that they are helping you mold into realism.

The big question is would I suddenly appreciate Jim if he miraculously went back to the man he was 10 years ago? Would I find the fact he was able to be a husband and a father in such a magnificent way enough? Would I be content and appreciative? I certainly like to think so.

Since I am reminded daily there is no cure and there are no treatments that can correct his decline, it is a moot point. But I think it is reason enough to pause and appreciate where he is now and how much we have to be thankful for. Starting with two amazing kids who continue to bless us with love and lots of great memories. And a man who doesn’t give up and who tries his best, each and every day.

Frances and Brad in Alaska, July 2014.

Frances and Brad in Alaska, July 2014.

 

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (7)

I love my kids

Frances and Brad, Sept. 2006

Frances and Brad, Sept. 2006

I am like 99.9% of the parents in this world….I LOVE my kids. I love watching them play sports and participate in school activities and I love hanging out with them (most of the time). I love the chats we have and I love the laughs at the dinner table. I love that they make me a better person. I love teaching them about the world and I love it even more when they teach me a thing or two. They are actually pretty good behavioral wise and both of them show me love and gratitude on a daily basis. I recognize how rare this can be with a 14 year old and a 10 year old and I am very, very grateful. I suck it up and savor every moment. Sometimes to the point of being a little too emotional and a little too sappy. I realize it won’t always be this way and appreciate what I have right now. They are by no means perfect, but I am proud and I recognize how seriously lucky I am to have them in my life.

There are moments I get really hard on them for not wanting to be with Jim more or for getting frustrated with him; just like I do. I don’t praise them enough for when they do show patience and when they are participating in his care. As with most of life’s moments, we see them clearer when they are firmly behind us. It is important to me to learn from these lessons and to keep trying to become a better mom, a better wife, a better person. The end result will save me from my self -destructive ways and from wallowing into a mass of self pity. It is difficult to feel sorry for yourself if you are constantly critical within your own decisions and behaviors. Some say I am too hard on myself, but when I consider the alternative of accepting my situation and letting myself fall to pieces over and over or become less of a person than I should or can be, I am not thrilled with what that person looks like. I would fall into a deeper hole because I would be so disgusted by looking into the mirror and not liking what I saw. I suppose without Jim to keep me in check, I am forced to do it myself and this is the way I can. I sometimes rely on friends and family, but they try to be too delicate with me for fear of making things worse or just because they want to protect me more than hurt me. Yes, it would hurt to hear something awful about myself, but in the end game, it would be better for me, Jim and the kids.

I often forget how different their childhood is from mine. I remember growing up being terrified for a while that my parents would die; either from cancer, a car wreck or something that would take them away from me. I can vividly remember asking them when they were going to die and begging them to never leave me. I still feel that way. I think most kids go through this phase at some point. Fortunately, those fears were never realized and I am blessed to still have my parents in my life, helping me as much now as they did when I was living in their home.

On the contrary: Frances and Brad have basically always known that their Dad will not be around forever. They don’t complain about it. Actually, they never mention it. I suppose it is just their “normal”. When we started realizing something was terribly wrong with Jim, Brad was just 5. He doesn’t remember anything different. He doesn’t have a carefree life without the burden of Alzheimer’s Disease. Ever. It is as engrained in him as eating fruits and vegetables or washing your hands before a meal. That is all he has known. Although I live in this family with them, their perspectives and thoughts are so different from mine. Their expectations differ and their reality is now including a disease that not only took their grandmother and uncle from them, but is taking their father too. And they are both fully aware, it could possibly take them or their sibling.They are extremely close for children this age and I am sometimes just awestruck at this. Frances has been gone during the week recently and Brad asked the first week she was gone if we could pick her up early, telling me “it just isn’t as much fun when she isn’t around.” And when I picked her up and brought her home, the first thing she wanted to do was see Brad.  I think part of the reason they are so in tune to each other is their common woe of Alzheimer’s Disease and losing their father in this manner.   What must that be like? How would I feel? I know how I feel with it being my husband and possibly one day my child, but what is it really like to grow up with this horrible mess surrounding you constantly? Is it like living in a war torn country? You just get used to it and learn to adapt?

Frances remembers Jim from before he was showing signs, but her personality allows her to be very practical and compartmentalize on a regular basis. I worry one day, when she is older, she will look back and have regrets. I worry I am not doing enough for either of them now to make it easier and more bearable later. I strive to give them as normal a childhood as possible: no favors from teachers or coaches, no special treatment from schools or organizations they are applying to. There are two rules that I will not budge on: not taking advantage of Jim and not manipulating our situation to their advantage. I feel strongly that it will only hurt them in the long run if they rely on his impending death to get away with things most kids their age try or if they are treated with kid gloves.

There are moments I think way too much about all of this, and I want/need someone to talk to….my husband would be my first logical choice, but as you know, it isn’t a choice that is available. So I sit, by myself, trying to single handily determine the best way to parent two children who are not only losing their father a fraction at a time, but who might eventually sit across from a doctor listening to the same horrible diagnosis.

I am sometimes so completely stunned, I am not able to function at my normal capacity. It just can’t happen. I can’t think straight and I can’t decide what to do about anything. I can’t figure out what to fix for dinner or where some papers should go or how to plan our lives financially. The stress and the burden of trying to stay “normal” through a very, very long illness and subsequential grieving process can make a person not only change their personality, it changes priorities, desires, rationality and common sense.

My first and most important goal is to raise two, healthy, children who are not completely scarred by a childhood overshadowed by death. If I can fulfill this objective, I will have been a good mom. I won’t know until years from now. All I can do in the meantime is the best I can, when I can. And then I need to accept I won’t always be my best. I will still be me, but I will just be a lesser version for a time.

Jim, Frances and Brad, April 2013.

Jim, Frances and Brad, April 2013.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (4)

Trapped Alive

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Sometimes when I write this blog, I have to censor myself. I don’t do it to protect myself, but to protect my kids, my family, or Jim. Sometimes it is because the reality of this disease is so harsh, so burdensome, so outlandishly crazy with the fact that more isn’t being done to help that I have to abstain from writing what I really want. There is a novel being written in my mind that would completely shock some and others would be like, “Yeah, I could have written that years ago.”

I am going to attempt to walk a fine line and discuss where I am and where Jim is. Actually a small facet of those.

I feel trapped. Trapped like a caged animal desperate for release. Trapped in a world I have little control in. Slammed against brick walls and thrown into a dark abyss of pain, selfishness and emotional upheavals that are unbridled and uncontrollable. I am stuck with Jim. I am stuck taking care of him and worse; I am stuck watching him become someone I don’t know. I am MARRIED to a person that can no longer use a hotel key card or who doesn’t understand that you can’t put the Costco cart inside of the World Market store. I bare witness to the mumblings and the utter disregard for clean clothes. I know it is politically incorrect to say these things, but I know I am not alone. I know that there are others who have these same thoughts. It is ok. It has taken me a long time to accept this. It’s ok because I don’t ACT on the thought of feeling trapped and suffocated. I am staying. I am here, doing the best I can. This is me, being me. Even when the kids were younger, I would sometimes be waiting for Jim at the door, ready to hand over the reins so I could have an hour of “me time.” And I love being a Mom and love being with them. But I have always needed my space.

When the kids were just babies I would read article after article on how to be the perfect Mom. You have seen these in parenting magazines….How to Raise a Giving Child or What Every Mom Should Do To Prevent Tantrums. I could never live up to the examples that were set in print. Now that I am a caregiver to my husband, I sometimes fall into that same old habit of trying to be the perfect care provider all over again. But this time, I am a little more mature (just a little) and I am being forced into a corner that will either allow me to excel or set my life on an uncontrollable  spiral. But this time, there are clear repercussions if I fail. My children will suffer at my shortcomings and so will Jim. If I don’t do this “right” I could lose the most precious and wonderful things in my life: my children.  I am choosing to excel. In order to do this, I must find a way to accept my faults. To accept my faults, I must be honest. And that is where this revelation comes in.

One of the things that Jim and I did well was accept each other. Sure we each had our little things we bitched and complained about, but for the most part, he let me be me and I did the same for him. Part of my appeal to Jim was the fact I was so independent. I loved being with him, but I liked my space. And so did he. It worked well. We did stuff together and we did stuff apart. He played sports, I hung with friends. We worked around the house together and watched movies together and then we would travel separately for work and it all came together nicely. Now, not so much. He is home. All. The. Time. I am told when I am not with him, he constantly asks where I am, when I will be back, looks out the windows and front door and paces. I haven’t seen it first hand, but I know this is typical behavior for an Alzheimer’s patient. But it isn’t typical for me. Or for Jim. I don’t do well with feeling suffocated. I need my time. To do whatever. It doesn’t even have to be anything major. Just going to the store by myself or walking a trail by myself or catching up with a friend makes a huge impact on my mindset. Over the holidays, I was basically attached to Jim at the hip and without me realizing it, I was subconsciously revolting. It is who I am. How can I change this? It isn’t cool to say you want some space but I NEED my space. I need my time to do whatever I want.

I have so little time left with Jim, shouldn’t I want to be with him 24/7? Shouldn’t I want to take him in; his smile, his laugh, his eyes, his hands, his everything? Shouldn’t I want to be there for every joke he still cracks and to guide him through his day?

No. I can’t. It isn’t part of my personality and even more to the point: I DON’T WANT TO. It is too hard. I hate seeing him this way and he still has a long way to go. And this my friends is the catch 22. I want to be with Jim, but I don’t want to be with Jim. There is a constant ebb and flow of emotions….. the reality is simple: I want to be with the real Jim and right now I am settling for an impostor. He has such a great attitude and still tries so hard and gives so much of himself….but he isn’t himself and sometimes it is too much for me to see him in this state, however amazingly good it is for someone at this stage of the game. It is such a far cry from the sturdy, autonomous, handsome man I have lived with since 1996. It cuts me to the core and sometimes I am just unable to simply be ok with the  man I am currently living with.

So, here I am. Being honest. I am not going anywhere. I am staying put, but in my mind, I am sailing the islands of the Caribbean or sitting on a dock overlooking a mountainous lake while reading a book or taking in the Northern Lights (on my bucket list) or snuggling with the man who always made me feel like a million bucks until he couldn’t anymore. And now it is up to me to make sense of it all just to stay sane enough to carry on.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (19)

Please fix that chick you see in the mirror….

This is such an amazingly good photo of Jim now. I love it. Dec. 2014.

This is such an amazingly good photo of Jim now. I love it. Dec. 2014.

I am searching. For me. For a way to survive. For a way to thrive. For a way to find myself in the midst of sorrow and angst. I am lost in my own mind of worry and contempt. Contempt for myself. I realized over the holiday break I don’t really like myself but I haven’t quite put my finger on why. You must understand I am a realist and I am just as hard on myself as I am on anyone else. Is it because I can’t save Jim? Is it because I have thoughts of wanting it to all be over, which in reality would mean him dying sooner rather than later? Even recognizing how difficult it will be to be a single parent, I sometimes catch myself wanting this to end abruptly so the children (and myself and everyone else really) won’t have to watch Jim lose himself and all he is/was.  Is it because I lose my patience with my children when I am tired or stressed or disgusted by the fact I still need to clean off my desk, clean the bathrooms, do another load of laundry and clean my room and fix dinner? Do I find contempt for the person in the mirror because she isn’t a superwoman after all?

It’s true. I don’t like myself. I don’t like my looks and most of the time I don’t like me. I don’t like the person who needs help all the time. I am blessed by the fact we have many friends who have jumped at the chance to help us. I recognize what a wonderful support system we have and also recognize I wouldn’t survive without them. But I would be much happier being the one to help than the one constantly sucking up whatever is offered our way.

I am emotionally a mess. At any given time I could cry or fill your ears with a myriad of complaints and turn it into a tirade and then end it by feeling guilty and regretting the whole mess. I am constantly trying to get a handle on my mental status, my physical well being and organize my life, my house, my thoughts and my world. But, it is completely impossible to organize anything with a spouse with Alzheimer’s Disease. Things are misplaced. Things are broken. Things are left incomplete. I feel like a mess. I want order and all I can muster is major chaos.

Sometimes, I sit and I look at Jim. Really look at him. I no longer see the man who swept me off my feet….I see the hunched shoulders and the thin body and the timid responses. I see a shell of the man that at one time I thought could do anything and would help me conquer the world. I feel so sorry for him. I don’t want to feel sorry for my husband because I know he wouldn’t want it, but I do. I can’t help it. The contrast from a few years ago to now and I know the contrast that will take place over the next year or so….it breaks my heart. For Jim. For our children. For our friends. Jim deserves so much better. Not just because no one deserves to suffer at the hands of Alzheimer’s Disease, but because he has always been such a stand up, kind, giving and all around good guy.

There are more stories lining up than I can share….but I will share the one that stands out the most to show how I am failing my family…..

I recently had to drive just over an hour away to take Frances for a new adventure in her life. I had a choice; I could drop her off and immediately return home, or I could linger and have dinner with a friend. I chose the latter.

So, Brad was left home with Jim. Keep in mind, I promised myself a long time ago that I would never have the kids “babysit” Jim. So, I get Frances settled and I go to a leisurely, wonderful dinner with my friend. While we are eating, I have my phone on vibrate so I don’t hear or see the two messages from Brad. When I get to my vehicle I call home.

“Mom, where are you?”

“I’m leaving now. How was your day? “

“Good. You didn’t tell me you would be gone for lunch AND dinner. I didn’t know I would have to fix me and Dad dinner too. I thought it would just be lunch. “ Ouch. 

“I’m sorry honey. I just got done with dinner and will be home in about an hour. Did you get enough to eat?”

“Yes. But why aren’t you home yet?”

“I stayed to have dinner with a friend. I told you I was.”

“Ok. I will see you soon. I love you Mom.”

“I love you too.”

Less than five minutes later, I get a frantic call.

“Mom!! Dad is crying. He has his finger stuck in the dog collar.”

“What? Can you undo the clasp? How did it get stuck?”

“I don’t know. It’s not the clasp. We can’t undo it. Mom, he is in pain.”

“Brad, go next door and get Rex (not his real name).”

“Mom, I can’t. I can’t leave him.”

“Yes, you can, go now and get him and he will be able to help.”

“Ok.”

Ten minutes later, I call and find out the neighbor has indeed come over and helped. Once I am home, everything seems fine. Neither Jim nor Brad can demonstrate to me how he had his finger stuck. Jim doesn’t even seem to remember it happened at all.

The worst part comes as I am tucking Brad into bed:

“Mom, I think you need to get someone to stay with Dad. You know. All the time.”

“I know. I have been thinking about it.”

“Well, someone besides me needs to be here in case an emergency happens. Dad can’t do anything and there needs to be someone here to help him when he can’t.”

Yep. Mom of the year right here. My ten year old has more sense than I do. Hiring a caregiver at home seems so easy. But it isn’t. It isn’t just about money (although that is huge). It is finding someone. It is making that call or several calls. It is having someone in your home, in your life, ALL THE TIME;  to see your many facets and to see the clutter and the mess and the ugly side of things. It is an intimate look into your family and your life and it is a huge step to take. I know I am about to take the plunge and I am not happy about it.

Next story:  Clingy and trapped.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (18)

Happy What?

Ice Skating, Dec. 2014.

Ice Skating, Dec. 2014.

There have been so many wonderful things that have happened in my life over the past month. But there have been so many horrible, ugly things too. I feel as if my life is one big oxymoron.

I am overwhelmed. Not just by holiday stresses. Those are actually a few things that pull me away from the normal stresses. Yes, stringing lights on the tree by myself versus the way it has been for the past 18 years sucked. Yes, shopping for everyone (including myself) by myself, sucked. Yes, there have been moments of extreme bitter nostalgia; when you remember how it was and realize it will never be that way again and you just have to keep moving on, but it doesn’t mean you like it and it doesn’t mean you are happy about it. You just do what you have to do.

There are times that I think the kids being so young while dealing with Jim makes it so much harder. And I think how much easier it would be if they were grown and on their own. But, there are more times that I realize them being part of our home right now, in this moment, saves me over and over again. I probably wouldn’t care about a tree or decorating (honestly, I only did about a third of our normal this year) and I probably wouldn’t sing along to songs on the radio quite as much and I am pretty sure I wouldn’t give two cents about watching any Christmas movies or seeing Christmas lights or even worrying about family traditions. Traditions I realize at moments of clarity are dwindling but I steadfastly cling to in the hopes of stabilizing their childhood. Traditions that have become more of a burden than moments of fun and familiarity. I struggled to get the tree from the same tree farm. I struggled to have us all decorate said tree. I struggled to do so many things that have become part of what our family does every year. But this year, I have secretly thought to myself, “Will I do this when Jim is gone? Will it matter and will we all want to do this? What is the point?” It is hard not to picture our life without him when he is still here, yet he really isn’t here, so it makes it somewhat easy to picture a life without him. Again, my life is one big oxymoron. How can he ice skate so beautifully, yet not be able to figure out his seat belt buckle? How can he walk the dog numerous times a day, yet not realize he is still in his pajamas? How can he eat like a horse over and over and never seem full or gain weight? How can he be slipping away from us so steadily and yet so slowly? It is all so confusing. How does anyone manage to live through this for years on end? How can I? How can the kids?

Frances asked for very few things this year for Christmas. Less than five things.(Actually both kids had extremely short lists compared to myself at their age) One of the main things she wanted was to see The Piano Guys in concert. When she first mentioned this, I had no idea who they were. I had never heard of them. So I went online and saw they are  a pianist and a cellist. They play beautifully and their closest concert to us was 4 hours away (with a good day of traffic. For us it would be 5 -6 hours). I contemplated for a very short time before deciding if my thirteen year old daughter wants to see musicians like this as her main gift, well, I am going to make it happen. So, I got tickets for her and I. She would have to miss a day of school, so I didn’t want to add Brad to the mix. About a week out, I realized,” Oh no! I need to have someone watch Jim and Brad!.” That’s right. I hadn’t thought everything through. When I bought the tickets, Jim would have been able to stay the night by himself with Brad just fine. But as time has moved forward, so has his Alzheimer’s. I cannot possibly put into words the sheer heartbreak I felt when I accepted the fact I needed to come up with a solution for that night away. It was no longer just a boys night alone. It was an ordeal and something much bigger than a simple concert. It was a new stage of our game. It was another slap in the face.

So, a friend stepped up to take the two boys. Another friend eagerly watched the dog. It was a lot to plan and organize. In the end, it was worth it. I think Frances and I needed this time away together. It was special in so many ways and I am grateful for being able to do so. We were finally to our hotel when I get a call from Brad. Jim didn’t want to go to our friends’ home (we have been there dozens of times) and he was getting irritated. The friend getting the dog called and reiterated what Brad had told me. The stress that flashed through my body is immeasurable. What could I do? I was 4 hours away and unable to help. Both friends told me to not worry about it, they would handle this and to enjoy the show. But how could I? What if they regretted agreeing to help us? What if this turned into a huge pain for them? What if this is the night that Jim decides to get violent? When I spoke to Jim on the phone, he told me he was fine, never complained a bit about going to stay with someone else and showed no signs of being upset. So weird!! I had wanted to take Frances for a nice meal, but we were running late due to traffic and we ended up getting something quick and heading to the show. We got there after they had started. I could feel myself screwing up the one thing I was trying to do right. I was in a state of panic. Running late and worrying about things back home. It seems that is the normal for me now. I do this on a daily basis as I work and try to keep tabs at home. It is the most stress and the most failure I have ever felt in my life.

The concert was great. I highly recommend them. As we sat and listened to their show, they played a song, Emmanuel, and I listened with such sorrow. It was beautiful and haunting and reminded me of Jim and our love for each other and the fact that I was taking this trip without him because it would have just been too much. As I listened to the sweet sounds, I thought of our plans for the future and past Christmases and how I wondered if he would be with us next Christmas. I looked around at the couples and the families and I hated the fact that our family will never be completely whole again. Yes, Jim is still with us, but in truth, he isn’t. Not the real Jim. Not the Jim that would laugh and participate and want to be part of decisions about what we were doing and what everyone was getting and even acknowledge there is a holiday among us.  I am lonely. I am sad. And I have had a really bad hand dealt to me and to our family. But, I can see the love our friends surround us with. I can see how blessed I am to have my parents to help us. I feel love from perfect strangers. I am forced to re-write our story on a daily basis and I must understand that my attitude and my point of view will determine if that story has a happy ending or not.

I wish you a very Merry Christmas or Happy Hanukkah or Happy Kwanza or just a perfectly peaceful time of year. We all need some peace in our soul and I send it to you and wish it for you. It will be what saves us all.

Frances and I at The Piano Guys concert. Dec. 2014.

Frances and I at The Piano Guys concert. Dec. 2014.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (12)

Three, two, one….breakdown.

Our family Christmas Eve, 2009.

Our family Christmas Eve, 2009.

I knew this day was coming. I knew I would have a day that included tears and sobbing and full body blowbacks. It happens now on a semi-regular basis and it has been a few months, so I knew it was on my radar. I was just thinking it would be in the privacy of my room, alone in the house and without an audience.

I am not sure how it started. I have replayed the whole scenario in my mind numerous times and I think I have narrowed down the trigger, but because it includes one of the kids and it is personal for them, I am going to remain silent. I will take full and complete responsibility. It doesn’t really matter the cause, there were numerous triggers, there was just one that was the tipping point when the others were the building blocks.

I took Jim to get his new military i.d. After calling and making an appointment and explaining he only had a passport and no other forms of identification, I was told that was all that was needed. In my mind, I was questioning the authority on the other end of the line, but what could I do?  You see where this story is going, I am sure…..we show up late; after some of the aforementioned troubles at home, after getting lost on the base, after asking for directions numerous times,  to a woman who promptly tells me she can’t help us because he needs two forms of i.d. I promptly explain to her that I had called and yadda yadda yadda. She told me there was nothing she could do. I was teetering on that breaking point. I could feel myself exploding inside;  I was like a volcano, ready to erupt but quietly releasing smoke signals instead. I explained again to her that he has no other i.d., he has lost his wallet and that he has Alzheimer’s Disease. My voice was getting louder and more direct and this could have gotten ugly, really fast. But I sat there, biting my tongue,  (Jim of course said nothing) and she silently typed away. The next thing I know she is taking his photo and asking him to press his left index finger on the scanner. But he doesn’t know his left from his right anymore. And he doesn’t know his index finger. And I have to help him. And his signature is a stark contrast to the beautiful penmanship he once graced legal documents with. It was too much.

We barely made it to the van before I lost it. Just lost it. I wailed. I cried. I moaned. I had tears, snot and drool all over the place. Jim just sat there. Silent and confused. Normally, I reserve this kind of breakdown to a solitary party, but today it was open entertainment for him and anyone else who walked by. In the back alley of my mind I was trying to get myself to stop. I knew I needed to get a grip and put my big girl panties on. But sometimes those panties don’t fit and there is no controlling the emotional outpouring that seeps through my body. I mean, really? He ended up getting his i.d., what was the big deal? How can I learn to let go of all the past manifestations?  Let go of the shattered handmade pottery bowl a friend who moved overseas gave us. Let go of the indoor plant that was knocked on the floor, complete with broken pot, dirt everywhere and now a dead plant? Let go of the constant lost look on Jim’s face. Let go of the misplaced items and the inside out clothes and the lost conversations, the loneliness and emptiness and the bitter sadness that has become at home in my soul. How do I release the frustrations of each reminder of the Jim that is no longer? How do I appreciate the Jim that still is while longing for the Jim that was?

Eventually I started gagging and convulsing enough it snapped me out of my hysterical state. I had mascara down my face. My nose was red. I had used up half a box of tissues. When I finally grew quiet, the silence was deafening. Deafening in the way that makes you realize how terribly loud you were and how awful you sounded.  Jim was still just sitting there, next to me and saying and doing nothing. Nothing. Which makes all of this even more heartbreaking when I stop to think of how he is/was. Not a person to sit by without trying to comfort. Not a person who wouldn’t try to fix whatever was wrong. Not a person who would look utterly confused and uninterested.

Later, I got to a restroom and looked in the mirror. There I saw I had somehow broken a blood vessel between my nose and lip. There was a thin, red streak right in the middle of my philtrum, connecting my nose to my top lip. I have never seen anything like this and have no clue how I did this during my meltdown.

I suppose it could be related to all of the pressure from holiday expectations. Or it could be the fact Jim is slipping more and more which adds more pressure and more sadness and more reality to the situation. Or it could be me having a normal rough day. Whatever the cause, I have come to realize it happens. It happens, move on.  I feel better (usually) and it lets me know I do care. Sometimes it is hard to see I care because I am too busy being a Mom or worrying about money or trying to fix dinner or driving to some practice or event or working or something other than focusing on our crummy situation. These moments of heartbreak and genuine sorrow and anguish let me know I am still human. I am still full of compassion and love and I am hurting. I don’t always allow that to show, but when it does, it does. Big time.

Then you know what happened?  I worked. I had a friend call and say “hi”. I got two e-mails from friends. I watched Frances play in a band concert. I saw Brad smile and show his wonderful personality to me and others around us. I picked Jim up from respite care and they told me while everyone was listing things they are thankful for, Jim said he was thankful for me. For me. The woman he had just watched sob and turn into a ball of mush.

So, I am good. I am muddling through and working through as best I can. I don’t have a manual on how to emotionally handle this and I am doing what I can, when I can, the best I can. Everything else will have to just be.

December 2013

December 2013

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (18)

Help your Caregiving Friends.

Jim carrying the tree to our vehicle at the tree farm. Dec. 2006.

Jim carrying the tree to our vehicle at the tree farm. Dec. 2006.

It’s that time again. You either love it or hate it. Few and far between are the ones with no opinion. The Christmas season brings back so many wonderful memories, it is hard to not become sentimental at the first notes of a favorite carol or feel as if something is missing without eggnog in the fridge or white candles in the windows. While all of this is remarkably picturesque and the stuff movies are made of, there is a lot of pressure and stress that tags along for the merriment.

So, I have decided to try to help all of the friends and family for caregivers of dementia patients. I am sure this list could have quite a few more things added, but this is what I have right now. As soon as I hit “publish” I will think of ten more things.

First of all, if you are taking the time to read this, you care and you are commended for being a supportive and concerned friend. But, (there’s always a but, right?) as much as you want to help and as much as you want to be there for your friend, it is as impossible for you to entirely understand what they are going through as it was for you to do so before you had children (or grandchildren). There is just no way to convey the enormous emotional and mental overload that comes with both. So be patient and let them seem forgetful and let them be late without glancing at your watch and let them forget to thank you for the wonderful dish you dropped off. They are grateful, but they think at the wrong times to mention it. And to those reading this who have “disappeared”…..don’t worry. You will be welcomed back with open arms. Don’t be embarrassed by the amount of time that has gone by; for most caregivers, days run into weeks that run into months and they aren’t really 100% sure how long it has been since you two last chatted anyway.

So here are the beginnings of some tips for friends and neighbors of caregivers. Please feel free to add your own in the comments section.

What a wonderful surprise this holiday decoration was when my friend dropped by to hang it on our front porch. That is the Christmas spirit….

What a wonderful surprise this holiday decoration was when my friend dropped by to hang it on our front porch. Words don’t convey how special this simple item now is to me.

  • Just be there. As their loved one progresses, it is lonely anytime of year. But during festivities and social events and times of sentimentality, life can be bittersweet. Just having a friend to be present is a huge gift. It could be just hanging out together, or it could be watching a tv show or calling or sending an e-mail or dropping by to check in or…..ok, you get the picture. Let them know you are thinking of them. It helps. A lot.
  • Help with decorations. We just went and cut our tree at the same tree farm we have been going to for 6 or 7 years. Love this tradition. It is our tradition. I can’t change that. I don’t want to change that. But this year, I had to come inside, get the scissors, (I had asked Jim to, but he brought them to the backyard first and then brought them back inside because he didn’t see me out there) cut the twine holding the tree to the roof of our van, put on the gloves and lift that tree and carry it to the bucket I got out and filled with water and I set it up and…ok, you get this picture too. Right? You know what? I don’t mind doing all of this. But I did it with Jim standing by watching and I knew it hurt him because he knew he should be doing it and it hurt me because I felt the same way. It was not a moment of triumph but a moment of inner-sadness. While I was trying to hang some lights out front, to keep that tradition alive as well, a wonderful friend popped by with a surprise; a decoration for our front porch. Not only did she bring it by, she hung it up and asked if she could help me hang the lights and garland.
  • If there are children in the home, ask if you can take them shopping for the caregiver. Or, better yet, ask the caregiver if you can borrow their loved one for a short time and take the patient to shop for the caregiver. If they are in a home, could you grab a little something the next time you are at the store, wrap it and drop it by the nursing home with a note it is from “Jim”? Can you imagine the wonderful feeling that would bring and the change in a day and a change in an attitude that could bring?  I no longer really care about opening presents Christmas morning. Yes, it is nice to a have something to unwrap and be surprised about, but really and truly, I know it would mean so much to Jim to do this for me, without me being the one to take him and to help him pick out something. A friend took Jim last year to pick out something for Frances and for Brad. My parents took the kids to pick out something for me. It doesn’t have to be the same person doing everything. Just do what you can to help in a way you are comfortable with. You might have to get creative, there are so many scenarios a family could have, but if you are able, please try to bring some Christmas spirit to the situation.
  • Help them help themselves. I want so badly to bake cookies, decorate, send out cards, visit friends, wrap gifts, sing carols and watch night after night of old holiday classics….but I just can’t seem to be able to figure out what I am doing. I’m not saying bake the cookies for them, but maybe see if you can stop by and help them. Or help them with cards (I am ashamed to admit we haven’t sent any out in years and now we only receive a handful) or ask them if they can sit with you and watch A Christmas Story (trust me, they need a good laugh). Just setting aside the time and making the effort and commitment to do these things will pay off because they will be so glad they did. And having your help will make it even more special.
  • Please do not stop inviting them to your annual party. They know you are still having it. They know they used to go. They know the only reason you haven’ t mentioned anything is because you have no idea what to do. Invite them anyway. Let them tell you “no” or let them find someone to stay with their loved one so they can join the fun. That is how much it means to them….they will pay someone and work hard to find someone to “sit” for them so they can attend. Better yet, be the friend who doesn’t care about going to said party and offer to sit for them so they can go catch up with friends and neighbors. This type of socialization and fun can be the difference between depression and happiness. Can you find a way to include them in your fun? If you are going to view holiday lights, can they tag along?
  • On that note, offer anytime to just come sit with their charge so they can do some holiday cheer. Whether it be dropping off gifts to friends or going to a movie or dinner or out for some holiday shopping ALONE, that is a gift to them all upon itself.
  • Don’t forget, when the New Year comes, think of them and invite them over or out or come by to help ring in 2015. And while you are at it, tell them how much you have missed them in 2014 but that you understand. Make a resolution (and stick to it) to visit them or contact them more regularly because your friendship means so much to you. It means as much to them, but they are just too overwhelmed to share that with you. Honestly, that is the best gift you could give. It doesn’t matter if you are ashamed because you fell off the face of the earth when they became engrossed in caregiving. It is never too late to come around and admit your selfishness and inconsideration and to make amends. They probably feel guilty for not calling you more or trying to reach out to you too. Relationships work two ways, but at some point there is always a person who gives more and a person who takes more. I have learned I am in the stage of taking more and it is a hard, hard, hard thing to admit and to do day after day. If you were previously the one who was usually a giver, you know what I mean. If you are a friend who usually takes, it’s your turn. You have to believe me, they miss your friendship and will most likely welcome you back with open arms. They didn’t stop coming round because they wanted to and it had nothing to do with not wanting to be your friend.
    Jim lifting Frances up for topping off the tree in 2010.

    Jim lifting Frances up for topping off the tree in 2010.

    Just give them a hug and be grateful for another day, another holiday season and another year together!

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (3)

Looking for the Easy Life

Jim wearing his Air Force blues with Frances and Brad for Career Day at school. Nov. 2010

Jim wearing his Air Force blues with Frances and Brad for Career Day at school. Nov. 2010

Sometimes in life, nothing seems to go right: lines are long, rain comes with no umbrella in sight, a drink spilled, having to stay on hold so long you miss another important commitment, you start to fix a recipe only to realize you don’t have a key ingredient…. Little things out of synch add up to entire days that feel as if the whole world is against you. It is difficult to look at each tiny annoyance as just that; an insignificant bump in the road of life. They all seem to run together to pull you towards a negative thought process and in return, a negative outlook and eventual sour attitude.

And then something happens. Stars align in a good way and your luck changes: a parking spot opens up in the front row at Costco, you win a drawing, someone you haven’t seen in a while gives you a call or better yet they stop by for a visit, the kids laugh instead of argue at the dinner table, work flows easily, you drop your phone and it doesn’t break…. Things fall into place seemingly with no effort. It is something you could get used to, but you know better. You know it is temporary and to enjoy it while you can. There is always a shadow lurking just out of sight and you are completely aware of its presence.

That is how I feel. I am teetering on an uneven, unstable cliff. At any moment, all of the good things that happen for our family can vanish and we can tumble, freefalling into nothingness, at any second. With me at the helm. Me in charge. Me being blamed if it happens. Me knowing that I am guilty of not stopping the inevitable from happening. Even though it isn’t my fault Jim has this disease, it will be my fault if I don’t keep our family from losing everything and it will be my fault if the kids have long term psychological problems and it will rest squarely on my shoulders if something unexpected happens to Jim.

With all of this weighing so heavily on me at ALL times, it seems a wonder I haven’t had some sort of nervous breakdown. Recently, I have felt like I might. I have felt the tension in my body. I have recognized warning signs and become aware of the pulses in my mind and muscles. I am cognizant enough to understand what is happening and that changes need to take place. I have the personality that lets me believe that I am capable of anything. If I don’t already know how to do something, I can figure it out. I can learn, I can adapt, I can do whatever is necessary. But I can’t. I can’t sustain this life. I can’t work full time hours that are dictated and not flexible, follow up on paperwork and appointments needed for Jim, pay the bills, clean the house, cook the meals, grocery shop, work in the yard, do the laundry, drive to lessons and practices, check homework and sign and duly note whatever slip of paper that is sent home this week from school and, somehow, through all of this manage to look like I am doing ok. I’m not. I’m not ok. I have a husband that will tell me he has taken a shower and washed his hair when I can clearly tell he hasn’t. I have a husband that lost his wallet two months ago (again) and I have to take him (again) to get a new i.d. I have a husband who can’t figure out how to put the covers on himself at night. I have a husband that has the best attitude in the world but can’t stop himself from making comments to the kids that can be hurtful and antagonizing.

So, I was trying to figure out what I should do about work and the kids and Jim and everything when life happened. Jim has slipped just a tiny bit more, but enough that I know I need to be here with him. If I am not, someone needs to. He can perform tasks, but needs guidance and oversight. It is time for a change.

Today, I can’t explain why, but I was upset and in a bad mood. The kids were getting the brunt of my force and Frances calmly told me,” Don’t take it out on us just because you are mad at Dad.”

And it hit me. It hit me like few things have. I wasn’t mad at him. I haven’t been mad at him. All the yelling and frustrations….it isn’t anger. It was recognition and it was sadness and it was being scared and most of all, it was helplessness at witnessing this great man succumb slowly to a death sentence I can’t argue away or buy a solution to or fight hard enough for. It was seeing him lost and confused and unable to perform a simple task that he would have been able to do a few months ago. I wasn’t mad, even though it certainly seemed that way. I was utterly broken and petrified at what I was witnessing.

As I looked at Frances and Brad, I saw the questions on their faces. Why was I upset with them when they really hadn’t done anything wrong? Why was I taking my frustrations out on them? I made the decision to be open and honest and share my realization. As I told them I wasn’t mad, but very, very sad and explained why, the tears came so unexpectedly. I forced myself not to sob, but I couldn’t keep them from my eyes. They seemed to get it. By being open and honest with them, they realized they were witnessing part of my mourning and my personal grief at the loss of their father.

Jim, Frances and Brad. Tagging our Christmas tree, Oct. 2014.

Jim, Frances and Brad. Tagging our Christmas tree, Oct. 2014.

I am not working this week.  I am pursuing options for Jim. I am not sure what will happen with my job. I know I can’t afford to quit and honestly, I don’t want to. I need a job that allows me to focus on something other than my own pity party. I need something that forces me to interact with others and shower and get dressed and put a smile on my face and fake some happiness for a time. I need that. But, I need to be able to answer the phone and attend appointments and have time to organize a family of 4.

I used to feel like I was turning into a single mom. And I kept repeating in my mind, “How do these single moms do it? Why can’t I? There must be something I am missing.”

Then a friend pointed out to me, “Karen, you are not just a single mom of two kids. You also have a third child who is home all day and who isn’t growing up to take on more responsibility, but is becoming more of a responsibility, a liability and a ‘what is going to happen next?’ How many things get broken and lost and half done that you must go behind and fix, find or financially figure out? Most single moms don’t have that extra burden.”

Friends save us. Family save us. Love hurts us and ultimately saves us. Grief rips us apart and time allows us to adjust accordingly. Alzheimer’s Disease forces you to grieve over and over again, relying on those friends and family to reappear as needed to enable us to do the adjusting that will keep us from shattering and unable to be saved.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (20)