Hospital Stay, Day 3

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Where do I start? Well, I will try not to ramble on with insignificant details. I will give you the great news first….Jim was released from the hospital today and went straight to a rehabilitation center. Because he stayed the required 3 days in the hospital first, his medicare will cover the costs with rehab. This is important information for you to know if you will possibly be dealing with a similar situation.

Before Jim left the hospital, Dr. ‘I think it couldn’t be Alzheimer’s Disease because he is so young’ came back by to do a final evaluation before discharging him. I thought we were moving past our initial meeting where I thought….well, see what his name is and you will understand what I thought of him. Breathe Karen, breathe.  Like I said, another conversion for another time. Back to today….the doc and I have a lengthy conversation about what Jim will be doing at rehab and what medications he will continue and some other not important for this story stuff. The main thing to understand and know is that we discussed the 2 medications he was on and would continue on…Mucinex and his antibiotic. He also recommended a breathing treatment, but not as important.

He gets to the new digs. I visit with him, get him acclimated and go home to pick up his clothes and some photos to put up. I bring Brad back with me to visit. I give him a shower because otherwise they won’t be giving him one until Monday. (ewwww.) We go back home to eat dinner. I go back up to make sure he is ok and get him to bed. He tells me he is tired and wants to go to sleep. No problem. I tuck him in and turn out the light and remind him I will be there in the morning. One last “I love you” and I am out the door. As I am leaving, I run into the assistant nurse. She is handing out medications. I tell her he is in bed and the lights are off. She tells me she will be going in shortly to give him his meds. Something unexplainable told me to ask what he was taking. I already knew the answer but for some reason I was prolonging my exit.

“Aricept. Lexapro. Namenda….”

“No. That isn’t right. He isn’t on them and hasn’t been for a long time.”

“That is what it says. If you have a question, you can go speak to the nurse.”

So I march, furiously and with purpose, to the front desk and find the nurse. I tell her I would like to look at the directions from the doctor at the hospital. There must be some mistake because my husband wasn’t on any of those drugs. But there it is, in black and white. I was pissed is an understatement. Not only did it have in his file from the hospital to take these drugs, it DID NOT list the Mucinex or breathing treatment. The thing that really got my blood boiling though was the very last paragraph. This paragraph was right below the line that said it had taken him over 30 minutes to do this discharge (we met for less than 10 minutes, so he must have spent a long time figuring something else out). This paragraph at the very bottom of the last page said that he had gone over this treatment plan in great detail with the spouse and said spouse was in agreement with the course of action written out. What? Are you kidding me? It took every ounce I had to keep myself composed.

Needless to say I made it very clear to the nurse that he was not, under any circumstances, to get the aricept, lexapro or namenda. If the doctor there at the facility had a question, they could call me. (They won’t see him until Monday). I then called back to the hospital to let the poor person who was stuck in the position to listen to complaints after hours hear how upset I was. This isn’t over. I am to get a call back on Monday. His meds are supposed to now be straightened out.

I know I am tired. I know I need to take care of myself. But there is no way I can let this slide. I respect doctor’s immensely. I admire the ability to get through medical school, to take an instrument and cut someone open, to save lives and change families and deal with death each and every day. I mean no disrespect to anyone in the medical field. But I cannot let this go. Putting Jim back on those drugs would have been setting him on a course of no return in my opinion, which is based on his already having been on them. This is very, very bad. Like I needed another reason to be upset and stressed.

I am so glad Jim was well enough to leave the hospital and has a wonderful spirit with him that makes you want to hug him and he continues to show us his wittiness. He is still having cognitive problems and his swallowing is also a huge concern, but he seems happy and he seemed to understand why he couldn’t come home yet. He cried many times today, just so overwhelmed to be with his family. And I am happy to still have him with us.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (11)