Phantom Lover

the-worst-feeling-isnt-being-lonely-but-being-forgotten-by-someone-you-cant-forget-quote-1

I’m in love with a man who cannot love me back. I think of him all day, every day of every week of every month. From my first moments lying in bed in the morning until my last tired thoughts trying to fall asleep late in the evening.

I long to call him with each new idea, thought and life event that transpires. I want to share each amazing feat Frances and Brad conquer. I want to call and ask him what he wants for dinner or if he can sneak away and grab some lunch. I want to hear about his day and carry on a conversation sharing our thoughts and desires. I want to laugh together at something funny on TV or sit in the darkness of a movie theater, jumping at the scene on the screen or wiping away tears as our hearts are tugged by the story unfolding before our eyes. I want to feel the excitement of catching up on episodes missed or planning an evening without the kids. I want to know he is thinking of me, as I think of him. But he is not mine. He is in a different place, with another life and is not interested in my fantasy world that includes him because his world does not include me.

I cannot have him. I dream of him. I yearn to call and ask if he would join me for a weekend away. Just the two of us, locked away in a cabin in the woods or lazily reading books while listening to ocean waves crash feet away.  Would I be satisfied with just a weekend or would I be left in an even larger state of isolation and frustration?  I have lost hope for a note in his handwriting, confessing how much I mean to him and how he can’t stop thinking of me. Does he? Does he think of me? Does he long for my touch as I long for his?

I am a woman with unrequited love.

There are no date nights. There is no lounging in bed too long. There are no passionate kisses and gentle touches. There are no arguments or the fun that comes with making up. There are no loving gazes, no words unspoken with just a glance. No plans for a future together or shared dreams to make come true.

Just me, recalling the way his hand touched my back as we walked through an entryway. Just me, wishing we could stroll arm in arm, chatting and feeling the warmth of friendship and love all rolled into one.  Just me, wondering how I will ever get past this loneliness and longing.

Although I ache for him, thinking of him constantly and wanting to share each detail of my day, he is not mine. He belongs to another. I am just a fleeting thought, someone to ponder about whenever I pop into his mind. Daily? Weekly? Surely when something triggers a reminder of me. There are fleeting conversations, but with each one I am left wanting more. I need more and he cannot give me more.

I instinctively pick up the phone to share something and realize the emptiness of that dial tone. When I am angry or sad I want to reach out to him and hear his voice. He calms me like no other. When something wonderful happens, it is him I want to tell first. I want him to grab me in his arms, pulling me into his chest, smelling his scent, feeling his strong arms holding me tight, taking all the anger away and reminding me I am special and loved and safe. I need him to make me feel beautiful again. I need him to make me feel smart and funny and worthy.

There are no cards. No flowers. No surprises. No late night intimate chats. No snuggles on the couch. No breakfasts in bed. Nothing but the connection I feel, the hunger I have, the dreams that will never come true.  I love someone who is a ghost.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (12)

Nap Time

Screen Shot 2015-10-05 at 11.33.22 PMI have nothing. Nothing to say. Nothing to feel. Nothing to do. I am numb. I am going through motions and I am doing the obligatory foot in front of another, but the reality is I am dazed, confused and paralyzed.

I went to visit Jim two weeks ago. He got agitated, which I quickly learned meant he needed to go to the bathroom. So, I took him to the restroom and he pulled down his pants and WHAM!! Adult diapers. On. My. Husband.

The next week, I stopped by to visit. I couldn’t find him so I asked the two people working his unit where he was. They said he was just there. So, they start looking room by room. After a few minutes, Jim is found. In a room with the door closed, with a person in their bed and Jim in that persons shorts and one sock and nothing else. Jim’s clothes and shoes and socks were on the floor. And the shorts were wet. And Jim had no clue he was in the wrong room or wasn’t dressed.

So, I got nothing. No words of wisdom. No fancy antidotes or metaphors. I have a new me. Being a shocked wife. Being a mom of two children, taking them to visit their father in a home with people 20 – 30 years older and him not showing much emotion or interest. And them laughing at the residents stealing walkers from each other and repeating themselves and seeing a world that none of their peers witness. There isn’t an ounce of perspective that has prepared me to become the judge, jury, executor, pardoner, appeals attorney and bailiff. I have nothing, yet I am everything. To Jim. To our kids. And to myself. There is no person to keep me straight. To help with my parenting decisions, my financial decisions, my daily decisions and my personal decisions. It is all on me. I have nothing to help with the loneliness. The isolation. Really. I am my own island, mostly deserted, and I am afraid that I am slowly getting used to it.

Not really what I signed up for but nothing a nap can’t help.

I am ashamed. Ashamed that I have taken more naps in the past two months than I have in the past 10 years. I am ashamed that my paint is peeling off my house. I am ashamed that I pretty much didn’t wear make up through the entire summer and because I didn’t, I chose to hibernate.I am ashamed I have missed countless birthday and reasons to celebrate or support others. I am ashamed I have not been able to master the clutter in my home for months now. I am ashamed my children have had to fix their own meals many times throughout the past several months.  I am ashamed that I have realized only too late that there is no more time to take the videos or pictures or have conversations with Jim that should have been done. I thought I had but there will never be enough to overcome the new memories that are taking over. Memories of the new Jim.

He is moving on. Without me. He is progressing and losing his ability to speak, write or communicate. I have lost him while he is living. I am alone in our bedroom. I am alone late at night. I am alone in my thoughts and feelings and emotions. I am alone at social gatherings and dinner parties and ball games. I miss him so and at the same time I want nothing more than to move on. I want to leave the pain and agony behind. What an awful spouse I am to even think this. I long for him and all he was even as I wish I could just move away to a new place and start over, leaving the hurt and worry behind. I can’t. I can’t leave him, our kids or the friends who have surrounded us with love.

Maybe I will go away for a week and call it even. Maybe I will wait until the kids are out of the house and I will disappear into the sunset. Maybe I will just stay where I am and dream for a different ending. Maybe I will do a lot of things but certainly not while I am taking a ridiculous amount of naps.

Jim and I never had the perfect marriage. But we always had each other and the knowledge that we were in this for the long haul. We knew that we wouldn’t leave. I am not leaving, but I am not with him either. He is five minutes away and I am struggling to understand what has happened, where I am going, what I am doing and what I should be doing. Nothing about this situation is traversable with ease, yet I must navigate carefully, so I don’t one day look back and regret any decisions, impact the kids negatively, cause stress or harm to Jim, and most of all, cause unforeseen and irrevocable damage.

I am constantly wondering and second guessing….  should I make the kids go see Jim? Let them decided? Bring him home for a visit? Leave him be? Bring him to our favorite places? How much should I try to keep in his world while he is moving on to another place without us? I struggle each day and when I can’t move past whatever it is I am fretting over I usually decide to take a nap. And when I awake, I realize I haven’t gotten the myriad of tasks done that I should have, now I am an hour behind on whatever it is I could have been doing and I berate myself for not doing what needed to be done. But naps are sooooo good. They let me forget my problems, even if only for 30 minutes.

My new self  isn’t much different from my old self: Worrying about the kids, about Jim, about the future, the past mistakes, the present mistakes, and how to keep from making futures mistakes. But now I tend to shut down. Take a nap and come back to it another day. Now I can add in where I  worry about all the stuff I am not doing because I am taking a nap.

I am better than this. Jim and the kids deserve better than this. I will be a stronger. One day.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (19)

Happy Today

Brad, Jim and Frances celebrating Jim's 53rd birthday. April 2015.

Brad, Jim and Frances celebrating Jim’s 53rd birthday. April 2015.

It sounds so easy. Take your loved one to a place that promises to watch them and care for them and allows you to go home and relax and focus on other things. How difficult is something so needed and so good?

We were given a 30 day respite through the VA this month. I was elated. The kids and I would be able to do the whole back to school routine, we would get to go to family camp for the fifth year, we would have time to get stuff done around the house (Ok, now you know I was really dreaming) and we would get to just breathe a little.

If you have never been to an assisted living type facility before, you have no clue what I am about to tell you, and it will most likely sound like something that should be shut down. But, if you have, you know what I am about to write.

You know the absolute guilt and heartache that come with the very first step through the doors. The smell of urine permeates through your whole body and clings to your clothes. The shock of seeing person after person almost in a comatose state either in a wheelchair or a bed. The horror of thinking how awful this place is and that you should be turning around and running back through the doors….yet you stay. You unpack clothes and try to seem happy about all of this. You see the dirt, the grime, the locks on everything, , the coded doors, the list of simple activities you can not believe that your husband would be happy to sit through….. It reminds you of a horror film but you are living it and you don’t leave. Well you do leave….alone.

You leave and cry and cry all the way home. The perfect sad song comes on the radio and you turn it up and cry even harder.

When your children go to visit the next day, you cringe again as you walk through the doors and see it all anew through their eyes. The moans from a bed as you pass, the loud daytime TV shows, the medicine cart, the food cart, the alarm going off when the door is opened incorrectly, the wandering, lost souls down each hallway. And they tell you what you already knew: Dad should not be here. This place is awful. We cannot leave him here! Yet, he remains and you return to the home you shared and the bed you no longer share. And you must kick into super awesome Mom mode. Think fast even though you agree with what they say.

“Was Daddy happy?”

“Yes.”

“Did he ask to come home?”

“No”

“Did he say he didn’t belong there?”

“No”

“Did he ask when he could leave or seem sad when we were leaving?”

“No”

“Well, we have to understand that Dad is content and likes where he is. Maybe he wouldn’t have a year ago or we wouldn’t want to stay there, but where he is right now mentally is what we have to think about. And he is fine. They are nice, they are looking out for him, he is laughing and we are getting a break.”

And there is the click. The change. The acceptance, the understanding that no 11 year old or 14 year old should have to fathom until they are old and grey themselves.

Jim is happy. He has a routine. He has activities. He has people to talk to.The staff watch out for him and know his signs.  He is satisfied in his own little world and is happy we can join him sometimes but has not asked once to come home. He has called to tell me he misses me but he doesn’t ask when he is leaving. He hugs me and I hear from the staff he talks about me all the time (and the dog and the kids) but he is contented to just be where he is. And where he is is a locked unit an hour away with patients much older and much further along. But he has progressed enough with the disease that none of this connects in his riddled brain any longer. And it is sad. It is sad to leave him. It is sad to know he accepts this new home (albeit temporary) and it is sad to witness his behaviors that mirror the other patients who don’t seem to acknowledge the world around them.

Did he really go into someone else’s room and take their photo album and put it in his room? Did he really get agitated because he was outside too long? Did he really not want to participate in a group activity? His changes cause our changes. His decline is our decline.

This short reprieve has been so, so wonderful for the kids and I on just about every level and in every aspect imaginable. The laughter and the carefree conversations make us acutely aware of how tremendously stressed we were without even realizing it. To acknowledge this is hard. It feels as if I am somehow betraying the love of my life. But when you are living your life, the best thing you can do is be honest about what is happening, what eases your burdens, what brings a smile to your face and what causes the stresses to disappear.

Life doesn’t get magically perfect because Jim is out of the house. I still worry a great deal about him, about finances, about the kids, about all of the things I worried about before but without having to keep a constant watch over him. Without the children fretting about him getting agitated or misplacing something they need or all of us keeping an eye and ear on guard for whatever is about to happen next.

None of this is easy. None of this has a good answer or a happy ending.

I spoke with my Dad tonight and we were discussing finances and planning Jim’s care (a typical conversation these days) and he asked me, “What about a year from now?”

And for the first time in my life I really understood myself in a clear and concise way. I told him ,”I can barely think about the rest of today or tomorrow. The most I am going to hope to even fathom thinking about and planning for would be six months from now. There is no way a full year would ever come into my radar.”

I am so grateful for this short break from the daily task of Jim’s care and I do wonder what we will do in a few  weeks. But I cannot dwell on it and ruin the time we have right now. I am good. The kids are good. Jim is good. And that is all I can ask for today.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (12)

What do YOU really think?

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 12.24.28 AMHow many drive the car they drive to impress others? Or wear certain clothes to attract attention? Or cut their hair just to entice a mate? Who in this world bases each action or decision on the reaction or perceived reaction from others?

And here I am, under an unimaginable amount of stress, grief and pressure to figure out what to do with Jim and unfortunately worrying about what others will think. Not just strangers, but people who mean the most to me…Frances and Brad. Their current thoughts on the subject and my worry about their thoughts years from now weigh heavily on my mind.

Home care? Institution? Just me and the kids?

I am inclined one way but then I envision having to live with that decision. So I start pulling toward the other solution. Not long after, I think of the original plan. It never, ever ends. Ultimately, my decision really won’t be my decision and I will probably laugh at all of the time and energy I have put into this. The decision will strictly be a financial one not a practical one. And that is really out of my hands.

I find myself justifying so many things with almost each conversation I have.

Earlier this week I chatted with a neighbor. I caught myself justifying. Not long after, I spoke with a casual friend who asked about Jim. Again, I was almost embarrassed as I heard myself repeating the same justifications.

Right now Jim is in a 30 day respite program we have been granted through the Veterans Administration. Wow! What a difference in our home. What a change in me and in the kids. Yet, I have felt the need to justify this welcome reprieve.

But to tell the story of relief is to tell of the burden and the stress and the unhappiness of having Jim at home. Who would ever want to acknowledge that life is better without their loved one with them? Certainly not me and not our kids. But it is what it is. And as I write this, my lungs almost collapse in shock and sadness. What kind of monster am I for feeling this way? How can I be a good wife, a good caregiver, a good person for thinking this, let alone saying it out loud? Me. I am. And I am tired of worrying what others think. Unless you have been taking care of a person with YOUNGER ONSET Alzheimer’s Disease WITH children at home, you are not allowed to pass judgment. You are not allowed to even think that you would do this differently. You really don’t know and could never comprehend what you would do unless you are actually living this very life with the exact same decisions and circumstances. Do I sound angry? I am not. Actually, right this very moment, I am happy. For the first time in a long time, I can breathe and I can focus on being a mom and nothing else (sort of) and it has been so nice. The kids and I have had many relaxing nights, fun days and times of reflective honesty. Yes, before Jim’s disease took hold, our family would have done these things with him and we would have been complete and whole. We are broken and the kids and I need to be able to move on. It is so difficult to try to move on while Jim is still with us. Yet, I don’t really want him to not be with us. Obviously it isn’t my choice whether he is here mentally. It is almost some kind of scientific wonder how he can be “here” physically, but he is no longer “here” mentally. Sometimes he is able to be part of a conversation or have a funny input or something relevant to what we are discussing, but let’s face it, he isn’t capable of being a contributor to decisions and barely can recall what was just discussed. The day to day change one way and then another is amazing if you stop long enough to digest it all. It does not please me to acknowledge these things. He is progressing. We are progressing. Life is hard. Life is complicated.

I often am forced to think back to conversations Jim and I had as he was in the process of getting diagnosed. We had many heart to hearts and he was always very adamant about the kids coming first. I know he had no clue the financial strain this would all have, but he was very clear on what he expected from me: taking care of Frances and Brad.

At this point, I just want to be able to be a Mom. Being a friend, a worker, a neighbor, a wife…all pale. I don’t have it in me to do all of the above as usual. I can only focus on a single point at any given time. Right now it is taking care of Frances and Brad as best I can under these circumstances. Then it is working on care for Jim. Wow. The paperwork and stress is indescribable.

I see Jim. He is happy in the respite. He is getting attention and has activities. He doesn’t have a lot of commotion. He hasn’t asked to come home. He hasn’t said he doesn’t belong there. Bittersweet. I am happy he is happy but his contentedness is a reminder of how far along he has progressed with this disease and it makes me so very sad.

Every time I see someone and tell them about Jim being in respite and trying to decide what is best for him, I find myself trying to justify and explain and to make sure they understand. Really? Why should I care? None of them are going through this. So do I really need to explain myself and what I feel is best for our children? Isn’t it apparent that everything I do is to make sure the kids are ok? Don’t they know that Jim and I had this conversation many moons ago and it is also his wish to put the kids first? Isn’t it obvious?

No, no. I feel the constant need to justify and explain to people who could not possibly comprehend the decisions and the magnitude of those decisions on the future of our family.

Yet, with all of my resolve to be strong and stick to my decisions from so long ago in dark, intimate times with Jim, leaving his care to someone else causes great stress and guilt. How could I ever be without him willingly? What kind of selfish heathen am I? How can I leave him to the trust of others to make sure he is clean and brushes his teeth and puts on clean clothes and stays active? Do they watch to make sure he doesn’t take the tooth brush and tries to clean the sink? Are they making sure he is washing his hair? Do they check to see if he is washing everything correctly?

The torture I feel is immeasurable. There will come a day that I will sit by myself and reflect, gazing at a beautiful scene and wonder how I did all I have done. But in the meantime, I struggle to find a foothold on what the correct choice is.  I struggle because I wonder how it will be for me and the kids or because of what others will think? Or because I will lose everything financially? Do I need a retirement? Do I need savings? Isn’t it better for me to have a stable, happy home for my children? But, isn’t it better for them to participate in the care of their father? Won’t that just grow character for them?  What if he gets violent again? Won’t it be my fault since I knew this was a possibility? Love hurts and love cuts to the very core.

Frances and Brad rock jumping at Belle Isle VA. August 2015

Frances and Brad rock jumping at Belle Isle VA. August 2015

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (18)

Tentacles

B1BKrDlCQAAkIBG

 

Jim has tentacles in me. Every part of my being.They are wrapped around my mind, woven throughout my body and engrained in my soul. His warm, soft tentacles encircled my heart and as they balance it precariously, they seem to harden and tighten their grip. His tentacles reach into our finances and my role as a parent. There is a tentacle in most of my friendships and in my career. There is nothing in my life that isn’t touched by him and that hasn’t been for the past 19 years. And now Alzheimer’s Disease touches each one of those things as well.

Sometimes I feel his tentacles being snatched out of me and it sears as if I have been touched by a radiating iron cane. The scars have started to form as they leave their marks. I fight it. I fight losing his love, his touch, and his help with every aspect of my life. A life now being ripped apart at the seams.

There are times I think, I can do this.

And then there are the dark moments that come out of nowhere and cause me to sink into an abyss.

I will get a bill from his hospital stay and fight with Medicare for hours on the phone to no avail as he sits quietly watching from the couch. Not long after, the kids will embark into a loud discussion and Jim again sits silent. By now I am on edge and ready to snap and all it takes is something simple…a misplaced item, something left out that should have been put away, homework not done before the TV gets turned on or rooms not picked up or dinner needing to be fixed or the trash smelling up the kitchen and I am the only one who seems to notice….. Something simple, that in the whole scheme of things doesn’t matter, will cause an enormous amount of pressure and unhappiness. When in reality it is the tentacles; the long, flexible organs that are burning me from the inside out. They are reminding me of the loss of my best friend, my co-parent, my financial advisor, my handyman, my confidante, my lover, my future and my past.

Watching Jim sit in the passenger seat during the brutally cold winter as I got out to pump each tank of gas. Seeing him in bed, unable to put the covers over his feet. Listening to him interject into a conversation with an almost unintelligible sentence that doesn’t relate to the topic at hand. Watching him fumble with his belt and unable to understand as I explain he is missing a belt loop or his pants are unbuttoned. Eyeing the unkept hedge (remember the hedge?), the edging needing to be done, the overall unkept yard Jim would never have allowed to happen.

I feel as if I am becoming androgynous. My role as mother is merging with the role of father. Taking out the trash. Mowing the yard. All of the things typically done in a household by the male. I realize this is awfully sexist, but in every marriage, each person has particular things they do. In our family, Jim did the “guy stuff”. Fixing things, taking care of the yard (except for planting the flowers), doing the dishes after I cooked, helping with homework or playing with the kids while I did my “girl stuff”.  We had our flow of expected responsibilities. It is hard to remember he used to pay all the bills or was responsible for keeping track of oil changes and inspections due. It is all me now. Plus I am accountable for his well being and care. Does he see the stress I am under? Does he see the paint peeling on the house? Does it bother him when I have to help him pick out his clothes? When he hears certain songs does it trigger a memory of special moments in our past? Does he think about me that way anymore?

This weekend is our 18th wedding anniversary. I took Jim to celebrate at a nice Italian restaurant. While driving, I made a concerted effort to hold his hand. I had to explain to him where to put his elbow and make him understand it was ok. But it wasn’t his hand I held. It was a stranger’s. It didn’t feel right in my palm. There were no callouses and the muscle tone was different and the grasp was uncomfortable. I tried to start a conversation several times to no avail. I tried to bring up our years together, only for him to get teary eyed.

I eventually just gave up and we ate in silence.

It is because we knew each other so well Jim was able to get diagnosed so early. I knew something was off and wrong extremely early in this nightmare, even as those close to us doubted me and pointed fingers my way and insisted maybe I was part of the problem. (I am still psychologically battling that one) I think he knew too because he never argued with me. I think he has tried in his own way to make this all as easy as possible on the kids and me. But there is no way to buffer the pain from his tentacles leaving me as he observes in silence, staring at something far off and unseen by those around him.  The touches are gone. The smile is gone. The lovely handwriting. Gone. Conversations. Gone. Help with the kids. No more. The pride in the yard and in his appearance. No where to be found. The connection and the emotional support. Vaporized.

The tentacles will continue to burn and leave me damaged. Ultimately I must find the place deep within me to regrow and become the person I am meant to be. It is no easy task while he is so clearly still here and needing me. I can’t move on, but I can’t afford to stay locked in the recurring torture zone. I am searching for that balance and the tools that will allow me to do both; move forward and remain steadfastly by his side.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (11)

Strong Girl

 

Cliff Jumping in Bermuda, 1993.

Cliff Jumping in Bermuda, 1993.

I was held up at gunpoint. I was on my way from my car to my apartment, walking with the man I was dating and suddenly there were two guys with ski masks over their faces pointing guns at us asking for our stuff. I remained calmed. I looked at the gun, less than an inch from my eyes, and thought to myself, “it looks fake”. I knew well enough not to ask the person holding the gun if it was. I knew there were people working out in the fitness room less than 20 yards away. As my date was fumbling with his wallet, I was asking them if I could just give them my money so I wouldn’t have to go through the hassle of getting a new license and replace everything in my purse. No such luck. As I watched them coward away, I memorized what they were wearing. I told my then boyfriend to go in and call the police and headed back to my car to try to find them (I know, I know, I have been told numerous times what an idiot I was). As a single female, I had followed all the precautions: apartment on the second floor, overlooking the pool, next to the office, etc. It didn’t stop an event that changed my life and could have ultimately taken it. I learned  you can try to follow guidelines and do what you are supposed to do but it doesn’t alway mean things will turn out the way you plan or the way you are promised. I was calm, cool and collected until after the police left. Then I couldn’t leave my apartment after nightfall for months. I would stand in my window and cry. I was haunted by the sheer brevity of the fact a slip of the finger could have ended it all. I was not the strong woman I had been for 26 years. I was living in my own prison. I learned that night the guy I was going out with wasn’t for me and ended things fairly soon after. Three months later, I met Jim. And my life was again changed. But changed so that I regained my strength and my ability to be strong. I eventually was even able to watch shooting and guns on TV and movies. All with the patience and understanding and support of a savior.

When I was 24 I packed my car and drove from North Carolina to Las Vegas by myself (before cell phones!), not knowing a single soul. I moved there for a job and stayed long enough to meet Jim. Again, following the rules….called my parents each night, let them know where I should be the next day, didn’t do anything crazy while driving across this beautiful land of ours. At the time, it seemed a normal course of action for me. I would not have respected myself if I hand’t gone. The person I was then must still be inside of me…right?

Aren’t we always taught to follow the rules and everything will be ok? It’s not. Jim didn’t do drugs. He was a good person. He worked very hard and was good at his job. He was quite a catch. Jim was safe. He was a good provider, he was a good man who would make a good husband and a good Dad. I took the safe road. He helped others and gave more than he received. Why is this happening to him? He was a much better person than I. He was a better parent. He was an all around better contributor to society. How is it he is the one being taken early? The unfairness is blatant. And now I am fumbling daily to find my footing and keep some sense of perspective that will allow me to help him navigate his new shortcomings and help our children remain intact and keep our home and figure out dinner and keep up with laundry and make sure the schedule is updated and homework is checked and everyone has taken a shower and eaten and is OK. But am I OK? I don’t know. I just don’t know.

My point of telling you these stories is to remind myself I am strong and independent and capable to be on my own. I sometimes forget who I was before I became a Mom and then a caregiver to Jim. What do I enjoy? What am I capable of? Who am I now? Who will I be when all of this is over?

I am lost. Really. I know when people see me they think I am doing so great considering our circumstances, but I am not. Not by my standards. And that is the problem. My standards for myself are pretty high. Always have been. But I can’t do it. I can’t be the person I was. I can’t do it all. I can’t keep my mind clear and focused and be the best I can. I am the best I can right now, but it isn’t my personal best and it isn’t acceptable. And because I know this, it bothers me.

There are days that I have so much I need to do, so much running through my mind, that I just shut down. I don’t cry and I don’t feel sorry for myself, I just shut down. I don’t do ANYTHING. And then I am upset with myself for not doing ANYTHING, and it becomes cyclical. Even worse is the fact I am completely aware of my new shortcomings.

I am strong. I mean, I am a strong, independent, capable woman. Or, I should say I was. When Jim and I met and married, I eventually made more than he did. It was our decision for me to stay home with Frances and try different gigs out of the house so I could be a Mom first. We had enough to live on with just his salary and we were both fine with that.  It was never an easy adjustment for me and Jim was really always the better parent, even though I was the one home all day with the kids. He was supportive and understanding and not once complained. When I would meet him at the door with a kid and tell him he was five minutes late and he was on duty, he loved it. He loved being a dad.

Even now, as he declines into his own abyss, all he continues to tell me as he cries, is that he wants to watch his children grow up. As he can’t recall their names, he knows he wants to be there to be part of their world and witness their growth and maturity.

I can’t take it. It is unbelievable painful to stand helplessly by as he declines and becomes a complete stranger to all of us who love him.

Just as difficult is to figure out where I fit into all of this…. What is the right way to navigate all that is thrown at me daily while staying his wife, staying a mom, staying a friend, staying ME?

I realize that I am morphing into a whole new entity. I don’t care about going out anymore (HUGE change for me). I don’t care about the latest movie or TV show. I don’t care about keeping the house clean….yikes. So embarrassing. My parents came for a visit recently and I didn’t clean one thing. NOT ONE THING!! Not a bathroom. No vacuuming. No dusting. Nothing. I have had them visiting me since that infamous drive across country and there has NEVER been a single time I didn’t clean and get ready for their impending visit. Never. Now, I can’t seem to find the wherewithal to do much more than change their sheets, which I didn’t do until after they arrived. Embarrassing and telling.

No, I am not the old Karen. But I know I am not the Karen that eventually will be. I am in a holding pattern. Not sure I am crazy about the Karen I am, but I have to accept there are major changes and events going on and I have to give myself some slack. Not an easy task. I am trying. I am working constantly on finding me while holding onto the task at hand.

I am grateful for the strength I possess. I am so very, very grateful to friends who understand and accept my changes. I am indebted to my parents for continuing to love me unconditionally. How are people who aren’t born with an inner ability to find that power and resilience able to handle this horrible journey? I don’t know. I am barely surviving and can’t imagine being able to without my natural fortitude.

Stay strong. Stay you when you can and when you can’t, forgive  yourself and know you will be you again someday. Maybe a different you, but a stronger and more resilient you. Repeat.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (14)

Doctor Day Sucks!

Jim and I. Dec 2014.

Jim and I. Dec 2014.

Today was DOCTOR DAY. I think in general we usually look forward to going to the doctor, even subconsciously, to get healed. Healed from whatever is ailing us. Healed from something we may not even know is wrong. Healed from things that hurt a little and things that hurt a lot. Eventually, with the help of the almighty physician, we are healed. Unless we have something that they just can’t heal. ALS. Huntington’s Disease. Lots of types of cancers. Alzheimer’s Disease.

Today, I saw the pain of not being able to help us on Jim’s doctors’ face. And in his words.

To start with, they called Jim back without me to do the mental exam. I knew it would be lower than the last visit nine months ago, but I didn’t realize quite how low. When they called me back, I could tell the nurse, who we always see, was a tad “different”. I knew that she had seen the difference in Jim. I knew it was bothering her.

When the doctor came in, he was his usual pleasant self, but when we got down to business, he fumbled over his words. He was struggling, because as a physician you are trained to heal. You are trained to find out what is wrong and to fix it. He can’t fix what is wrong with Jim. Jim went down 6 points on the memory exam. I looked at the drawing of the clock which is always part of the exam and I saw there were no hands and the numbers were wrong. My heart sank. Even though I know he is declining, seeing it in black and white is hard. Hard. For ALL of us.

When I entered the room and it was just Jim and I, he started to cry. He knew. He knew he hadn’t done well on the test. He isn’t far enough gone to be completely oblivious. This is so painful to watch. This wonderful man, crying and realizing what is happening to him and not being able to do one single thing to make it better. He told me he wanted to move away. I asked him why. “So the kids don’t have to see me like this. I don’t want them to see me the way I am going to be.” It took every ounce of self control not to burst into tears with him. I saved that for later.

I recently went for a walk with a friend. During our hike, we discussed Jim and lots of different sides of being his caregiver. Part of the conversation went like this:

Me: I don’t really feel sorry for myself. I think sometimes I come pretty close, but for the most part, I don’t think I am.

My friend: Really? I thought from reading your blog that you were pretty sad most of the time.

(At this point I was a little surprised since I didn’t know she was keeping up with this blog)

Me: Not really. Yeah, I get sad, but I can’t stay that way all the time. It would be awful for Jim and for the kids.

My friend: You don’t feel like you feel sorry for yourself?

Me: No. I feel sorry for Jim. I look at him and I just really feel sorry for him. And I think about the kids not having him for a dad. He was such a great dad and they won’t remember all the awesome things he did with them and for them. I am a much worse parent and it’s actually sorta sad that he is the one leaving them and not me. He would be more patient and teach them so much more. I get really sad thinking that they won’t have him around and they will watch him decline more and more and it is taking over their whole childhood.

My friend: You are a great parent. You shouldn’t say that.

And then we walked. Because, what else was there to say?

Back to the doctor visit…. The doctor recommended we try Namenda and the Exelon patch again. As I have written in past blog posts, we have tried EVERYTHING and I am not going to rehash why Jim is off all meds at this time. But, I believe we are going to give them another try. He told us that sometimes when a patient is further along and showing increased symptoms the medications can show help in lessoning some of the symptoms. But of course, they aren’t a cure. As the doctor spoke and Jim listened, he started to cry again. He understood he was hearing that he is declining. The doctor told us we wouldn’t do the memory tests anymore because there wasn’t a purpose any longer and it was causing stress. He also told us we didn’t need to schedule an appointment for a set amount of time. We would start the medications and call in as needed. There is no point in seeing him as Jim declines because there is nothing else he can do. This is not to say we can’t come see him and won’t, but there is no set six month or nine month time frame anymore. Just whenever we feel we need to see him.

Whew. I am crying as I write these words. My heart aches for not only Jim, but all of us who travel this journey with no help. No way to fight. No hope.

I am not a scientific person, but many times I wish for a scientific answer. How long does Jim have? What trajectory is he on with the decline he has shown? It may seem a little morbid to some, yet others will completely understand. I think it is human nature to want to know how long you will have to endure a form of torture and pain. When will this be over? When will Jim not be in pain? Actually, that is more of a clichéd expression. Jim isn’t in pain. Only when he realizes he is leaving his children. Most of the time, he is happy go lucky and in great spirits. He has a great attitude and is very pleasant to be around. He isn’t angry or sad or even moping around. He has the best attitude he could have and I am so proud of him. So when I say something about wanting a time frame, it isn’t because I want him to be gone, it is because I am trying to plan, trying to figure things out, trying to adjust and have a concept of what lies ahead. I believe people do this in all aspects of life; whether it is planning for high school, college, their first job, marriage, having a child, moving to another country, moving out of their parents home, changing jobs, etc. We are always looking ahead and asking for time lines.

It was mentioned that Jim was declining faster than some, but not as fast as others. I guess you would say he is somewhere in the middle. Not a fast decline but not a slow one either. I didn’t ask the doctor about a time frame. He wouldn’t be able to tell me. Alzheimer’s Disease works so differently for each patient. And Jim is very healthy otherwise. I know this is a long haul. I can handle it. We all can handle it. But I hate that he is having to and I hate that the kids are having to. I hate that my friends have to take care of us and I hate that my parents must use up so much of their retirement years rushing to help us. I despise being the damsel in distress. I know Jim despises it too. He was our knight in shining armor and unfortunately, he knows he isn’t any more.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (22)

Happy What?

Ice Skating, Dec. 2014.

Ice Skating, Dec. 2014.

There have been so many wonderful things that have happened in my life over the past month. But there have been so many horrible, ugly things too. I feel as if my life is one big oxymoron.

I am overwhelmed. Not just by holiday stresses. Those are actually a few things that pull me away from the normal stresses. Yes, stringing lights on the tree by myself versus the way it has been for the past 18 years sucked. Yes, shopping for everyone (including myself) by myself, sucked. Yes, there have been moments of extreme bitter nostalgia; when you remember how it was and realize it will never be that way again and you just have to keep moving on, but it doesn’t mean you like it and it doesn’t mean you are happy about it. You just do what you have to do.

There are times that I think the kids being so young while dealing with Jim makes it so much harder. And I think how much easier it would be if they were grown and on their own. But, there are more times that I realize them being part of our home right now, in this moment, saves me over and over again. I probably wouldn’t care about a tree or decorating (honestly, I only did about a third of our normal this year) and I probably wouldn’t sing along to songs on the radio quite as much and I am pretty sure I wouldn’t give two cents about watching any Christmas movies or seeing Christmas lights or even worrying about family traditions. Traditions I realize at moments of clarity are dwindling but I steadfastly cling to in the hopes of stabilizing their childhood. Traditions that have become more of a burden than moments of fun and familiarity. I struggled to get the tree from the same tree farm. I struggled to have us all decorate said tree. I struggled to do so many things that have become part of what our family does every year. But this year, I have secretly thought to myself, “Will I do this when Jim is gone? Will it matter and will we all want to do this? What is the point?” It is hard not to picture our life without him when he is still here, yet he really isn’t here, so it makes it somewhat easy to picture a life without him. Again, my life is one big oxymoron. How can he ice skate so beautifully, yet not be able to figure out his seat belt buckle? How can he walk the dog numerous times a day, yet not realize he is still in his pajamas? How can he eat like a horse over and over and never seem full or gain weight? How can he be slipping away from us so steadily and yet so slowly? It is all so confusing. How does anyone manage to live through this for years on end? How can I? How can the kids?

Frances asked for very few things this year for Christmas. Less than five things.(Actually both kids had extremely short lists compared to myself at their age) One of the main things she wanted was to see The Piano Guys in concert. When she first mentioned this, I had no idea who they were. I had never heard of them. So I went online and saw they are  a pianist and a cellist. They play beautifully and their closest concert to us was 4 hours away (with a good day of traffic. For us it would be 5 -6 hours). I contemplated for a very short time before deciding if my thirteen year old daughter wants to see musicians like this as her main gift, well, I am going to make it happen. So, I got tickets for her and I. She would have to miss a day of school, so I didn’t want to add Brad to the mix. About a week out, I realized,” Oh no! I need to have someone watch Jim and Brad!.” That’s right. I hadn’t thought everything through. When I bought the tickets, Jim would have been able to stay the night by himself with Brad just fine. But as time has moved forward, so has his Alzheimer’s. I cannot possibly put into words the sheer heartbreak I felt when I accepted the fact I needed to come up with a solution for that night away. It was no longer just a boys night alone. It was an ordeal and something much bigger than a simple concert. It was a new stage of our game. It was another slap in the face.

So, a friend stepped up to take the two boys. Another friend eagerly watched the dog. It was a lot to plan and organize. In the end, it was worth it. I think Frances and I needed this time away together. It was special in so many ways and I am grateful for being able to do so. We were finally to our hotel when I get a call from Brad. Jim didn’t want to go to our friends’ home (we have been there dozens of times) and he was getting irritated. The friend getting the dog called and reiterated what Brad had told me. The stress that flashed through my body is immeasurable. What could I do? I was 4 hours away and unable to help. Both friends told me to not worry about it, they would handle this and to enjoy the show. But how could I? What if they regretted agreeing to help us? What if this turned into a huge pain for them? What if this is the night that Jim decides to get violent? When I spoke to Jim on the phone, he told me he was fine, never complained a bit about going to stay with someone else and showed no signs of being upset. So weird!! I had wanted to take Frances for a nice meal, but we were running late due to traffic and we ended up getting something quick and heading to the show. We got there after they had started. I could feel myself screwing up the one thing I was trying to do right. I was in a state of panic. Running late and worrying about things back home. It seems that is the normal for me now. I do this on a daily basis as I work and try to keep tabs at home. It is the most stress and the most failure I have ever felt in my life.

The concert was great. I highly recommend them. As we sat and listened to their show, they played a song, Emmanuel, and I listened with such sorrow. It was beautiful and haunting and reminded me of Jim and our love for each other and the fact that I was taking this trip without him because it would have just been too much. As I listened to the sweet sounds, I thought of our plans for the future and past Christmases and how I wondered if he would be with us next Christmas. I looked around at the couples and the families and I hated the fact that our family will never be completely whole again. Yes, Jim is still with us, but in truth, he isn’t. Not the real Jim. Not the Jim that would laugh and participate and want to be part of decisions about what we were doing and what everyone was getting and even acknowledge there is a holiday among us.  I am lonely. I am sad. And I have had a really bad hand dealt to me and to our family. But, I can see the love our friends surround us with. I can see how blessed I am to have my parents to help us. I feel love from perfect strangers. I am forced to re-write our story on a daily basis and I must understand that my attitude and my point of view will determine if that story has a happy ending or not.

I wish you a very Merry Christmas or Happy Hanukkah or Happy Kwanza or just a perfectly peaceful time of year. We all need some peace in our soul and I send it to you and wish it for you. It will be what saves us all.

Frances and I at The Piano Guys concert. Dec. 2014.

Frances and I at The Piano Guys concert. Dec. 2014.

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (12)

Three, two, one….breakdown.

Our family Christmas Eve, 2009.

Our family Christmas Eve, 2009.

I knew this day was coming. I knew I would have a day that included tears and sobbing and full body blowbacks. It happens now on a semi-regular basis and it has been a few months, so I knew it was on my radar. I was just thinking it would be in the privacy of my room, alone in the house and without an audience.

I am not sure how it started. I have replayed the whole scenario in my mind numerous times and I think I have narrowed down the trigger, but because it includes one of the kids and it is personal for them, I am going to remain silent. I will take full and complete responsibility. It doesn’t really matter the cause, there were numerous triggers, there was just one that was the tipping point when the others were the building blocks.

I took Jim to get his new military i.d. After calling and making an appointment and explaining he only had a passport and no other forms of identification, I was told that was all that was needed. In my mind, I was questioning the authority on the other end of the line, but what could I do?  You see where this story is going, I am sure…..we show up late; after some of the aforementioned troubles at home, after getting lost on the base, after asking for directions numerous times,  to a woman who promptly tells me she can’t help us because he needs two forms of i.d. I promptly explain to her that I had called and yadda yadda yadda. She told me there was nothing she could do. I was teetering on that breaking point. I could feel myself exploding inside;  I was like a volcano, ready to erupt but quietly releasing smoke signals instead. I explained again to her that he has no other i.d., he has lost his wallet and that he has Alzheimer’s Disease. My voice was getting louder and more direct and this could have gotten ugly, really fast. But I sat there, biting my tongue,  (Jim of course said nothing) and she silently typed away. The next thing I know she is taking his photo and asking him to press his left index finger on the scanner. But he doesn’t know his left from his right anymore. And he doesn’t know his index finger. And I have to help him. And his signature is a stark contrast to the beautiful penmanship he once graced legal documents with. It was too much.

We barely made it to the van before I lost it. Just lost it. I wailed. I cried. I moaned. I had tears, snot and drool all over the place. Jim just sat there. Silent and confused. Normally, I reserve this kind of breakdown to a solitary party, but today it was open entertainment for him and anyone else who walked by. In the back alley of my mind I was trying to get myself to stop. I knew I needed to get a grip and put my big girl panties on. But sometimes those panties don’t fit and there is no controlling the emotional outpouring that seeps through my body. I mean, really? He ended up getting his i.d., what was the big deal? How can I learn to let go of all the past manifestations?  Let go of the shattered handmade pottery bowl a friend who moved overseas gave us. Let go of the indoor plant that was knocked on the floor, complete with broken pot, dirt everywhere and now a dead plant? Let go of the constant lost look on Jim’s face. Let go of the misplaced items and the inside out clothes and the lost conversations, the loneliness and emptiness and the bitter sadness that has become at home in my soul. How do I release the frustrations of each reminder of the Jim that is no longer? How do I appreciate the Jim that still is while longing for the Jim that was?

Eventually I started gagging and convulsing enough it snapped me out of my hysterical state. I had mascara down my face. My nose was red. I had used up half a box of tissues. When I finally grew quiet, the silence was deafening. Deafening in the way that makes you realize how terribly loud you were and how awful you sounded.  Jim was still just sitting there, next to me and saying and doing nothing. Nothing. Which makes all of this even more heartbreaking when I stop to think of how he is/was. Not a person to sit by without trying to comfort. Not a person who wouldn’t try to fix whatever was wrong. Not a person who would look utterly confused and uninterested.

Later, I got to a restroom and looked in the mirror. There I saw I had somehow broken a blood vessel between my nose and lip. There was a thin, red streak right in the middle of my philtrum, connecting my nose to my top lip. I have never seen anything like this and have no clue how I did this during my meltdown.

I suppose it could be related to all of the pressure from holiday expectations. Or it could be the fact Jim is slipping more and more which adds more pressure and more sadness and more reality to the situation. Or it could be me having a normal rough day. Whatever the cause, I have come to realize it happens. It happens, move on.  I feel better (usually) and it lets me know I do care. Sometimes it is hard to see I care because I am too busy being a Mom or worrying about money or trying to fix dinner or driving to some practice or event or working or something other than focusing on our crummy situation. These moments of heartbreak and genuine sorrow and anguish let me know I am still human. I am still full of compassion and love and I am hurting. I don’t always allow that to show, but when it does, it does. Big time.

Then you know what happened?  I worked. I had a friend call and say “hi”. I got two e-mails from friends. I watched Frances play in a band concert. I saw Brad smile and show his wonderful personality to me and others around us. I picked Jim up from respite care and they told me while everyone was listing things they are thankful for, Jim said he was thankful for me. For me. The woman he had just watched sob and turn into a ball of mush.

So, I am good. I am muddling through and working through as best I can. I don’t have a manual on how to emotionally handle this and I am doing what I can, when I can, the best I can. Everything else will have to just be.

December 2013

December 2013

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (18)

Help your Caregiving Friends.

Jim carrying the tree to our vehicle at the tree farm. Dec. 2006.

Jim carrying the tree to our vehicle at the tree farm. Dec. 2006.

It’s that time again. You either love it or hate it. Few and far between are the ones with no opinion. The Christmas season brings back so many wonderful memories, it is hard to not become sentimental at the first notes of a favorite carol or feel as if something is missing without eggnog in the fridge or white candles in the windows. While all of this is remarkably picturesque and the stuff movies are made of, there is a lot of pressure and stress that tags along for the merriment.

So, I have decided to try to help all of the friends and family for caregivers of dementia patients. I am sure this list could have quite a few more things added, but this is what I have right now. As soon as I hit “publish” I will think of ten more things.

First of all, if you are taking the time to read this, you care and you are commended for being a supportive and concerned friend. But, (there’s always a but, right?) as much as you want to help and as much as you want to be there for your friend, it is as impossible for you to entirely understand what they are going through as it was for you to do so before you had children (or grandchildren). There is just no way to convey the enormous emotional and mental overload that comes with both. So be patient and let them seem forgetful and let them be late without glancing at your watch and let them forget to thank you for the wonderful dish you dropped off. They are grateful, but they think at the wrong times to mention it. And to those reading this who have “disappeared”…..don’t worry. You will be welcomed back with open arms. Don’t be embarrassed by the amount of time that has gone by; for most caregivers, days run into weeks that run into months and they aren’t really 100% sure how long it has been since you two last chatted anyway.

So here are the beginnings of some tips for friends and neighbors of caregivers. Please feel free to add your own in the comments section.

What a wonderful surprise this holiday decoration was when my friend dropped by to hang it on our front porch. That is the Christmas spirit….

What a wonderful surprise this holiday decoration was when my friend dropped by to hang it on our front porch. Words don’t convey how special this simple item now is to me.

  • Just be there. As their loved one progresses, it is lonely anytime of year. But during festivities and social events and times of sentimentality, life can be bittersweet. Just having a friend to be present is a huge gift. It could be just hanging out together, or it could be watching a tv show or calling or sending an e-mail or dropping by to check in or…..ok, you get the picture. Let them know you are thinking of them. It helps. A lot.
  • Help with decorations. We just went and cut our tree at the same tree farm we have been going to for 6 or 7 years. Love this tradition. It is our tradition. I can’t change that. I don’t want to change that. But this year, I had to come inside, get the scissors, (I had asked Jim to, but he brought them to the backyard first and then brought them back inside because he didn’t see me out there) cut the twine holding the tree to the roof of our van, put on the gloves and lift that tree and carry it to the bucket I got out and filled with water and I set it up and…ok, you get this picture too. Right? You know what? I don’t mind doing all of this. But I did it with Jim standing by watching and I knew it hurt him because he knew he should be doing it and it hurt me because I felt the same way. It was not a moment of triumph but a moment of inner-sadness. While I was trying to hang some lights out front, to keep that tradition alive as well, a wonderful friend popped by with a surprise; a decoration for our front porch. Not only did she bring it by, she hung it up and asked if she could help me hang the lights and garland.
  • If there are children in the home, ask if you can take them shopping for the caregiver. Or, better yet, ask the caregiver if you can borrow their loved one for a short time and take the patient to shop for the caregiver. If they are in a home, could you grab a little something the next time you are at the store, wrap it and drop it by the nursing home with a note it is from “Jim”? Can you imagine the wonderful feeling that would bring and the change in a day and a change in an attitude that could bring?  I no longer really care about opening presents Christmas morning. Yes, it is nice to a have something to unwrap and be surprised about, but really and truly, I know it would mean so much to Jim to do this for me, without me being the one to take him and to help him pick out something. A friend took Jim last year to pick out something for Frances and for Brad. My parents took the kids to pick out something for me. It doesn’t have to be the same person doing everything. Just do what you can to help in a way you are comfortable with. You might have to get creative, there are so many scenarios a family could have, but if you are able, please try to bring some Christmas spirit to the situation.
  • Help them help themselves. I want so badly to bake cookies, decorate, send out cards, visit friends, wrap gifts, sing carols and watch night after night of old holiday classics….but I just can’t seem to be able to figure out what I am doing. I’m not saying bake the cookies for them, but maybe see if you can stop by and help them. Or help them with cards (I am ashamed to admit we haven’t sent any out in years and now we only receive a handful) or ask them if they can sit with you and watch A Christmas Story (trust me, they need a good laugh). Just setting aside the time and making the effort and commitment to do these things will pay off because they will be so glad they did. And having your help will make it even more special.
  • Please do not stop inviting them to your annual party. They know you are still having it. They know they used to go. They know the only reason you haven’ t mentioned anything is because you have no idea what to do. Invite them anyway. Let them tell you “no” or let them find someone to stay with their loved one so they can join the fun. That is how much it means to them….they will pay someone and work hard to find someone to “sit” for them so they can attend. Better yet, be the friend who doesn’t care about going to said party and offer to sit for them so they can go catch up with friends and neighbors. This type of socialization and fun can be the difference between depression and happiness. Can you find a way to include them in your fun? If you are going to view holiday lights, can they tag along?
  • On that note, offer anytime to just come sit with their charge so they can do some holiday cheer. Whether it be dropping off gifts to friends or going to a movie or dinner or out for some holiday shopping ALONE, that is a gift to them all upon itself.
  • Don’t forget, when the New Year comes, think of them and invite them over or out or come by to help ring in 2015. And while you are at it, tell them how much you have missed them in 2014 but that you understand. Make a resolution (and stick to it) to visit them or contact them more regularly because your friendship means so much to you. It means as much to them, but they are just too overwhelmed to share that with you. Honestly, that is the best gift you could give. It doesn’t matter if you are ashamed because you fell off the face of the earth when they became engrossed in caregiving. It is never too late to come around and admit your selfishness and inconsideration and to make amends. They probably feel guilty for not calling you more or trying to reach out to you too. Relationships work two ways, but at some point there is always a person who gives more and a person who takes more. I have learned I am in the stage of taking more and it is a hard, hard, hard thing to admit and to do day after day. If you were previously the one who was usually a giver, you know what I mean. If you are a friend who usually takes, it’s your turn. You have to believe me, they miss your friendship and will most likely welcome you back with open arms. They didn’t stop coming round because they wanted to and it had nothing to do with not wanting to be your friend.
    Jim lifting Frances up for topping off the tree in 2010.

    Jim lifting Frances up for topping off the tree in 2010.

    Just give them a hug and be grateful for another day, another holiday season and another year together!

posted by Karen in Early Signs of Alzheimer's,Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease,Uncategorized,Younger Onset Alzheimer's Disease and have Comments (3)